Jescollection.com

Nevada: (702) 613.4660 Toll Free: (844) 537.6742

Nevada: (702) 613.4660 Toll Free: (844) 537.6742

Cart
Menu Icon

Bug Away Natural Organic Insect Deterrent Spray 8 oz

Bug Away Natural Organic Insect Deterrent Spray 8 oz

Item #: NBAID

Retail price: $15.00

Availability: Usually ships the next business day

Natural Organic Age Defying Skin Care Products,Natural Organic Makeup,Natural Organic Personal Care Products, No Parabens or Toxic Chemicals, Gluten Free. Vegan,Made in the USA. Best Quality at affordable prices. NO Animal Testing.
All Natural Organic Bug Away Insect Deterrent is perfect for the summer-time swarms. NO DEET, parabens or toxic chemicals! 8 oz. Spray Bottle, also available in smaller purse/travel sizes - 2 oz. Great for your car, bike riding, hiking, being on the go. Shake well before using each time.

Catnip:
Researchers report that nepetalactone, the essential oil in catnip that gives the plant its characteristic odor, is about ten times more effective at repelling mosquitoes than DEET — the compound used in most commercial insect repellents.

Cedarwood:
antiseptic, relieves skin inflammation, bug bites

Cinnamon Leaf:
shows promise as a great-smelling, environmentally friendly pesticide, with the ability to kill mosquito larvae, according to a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. The researchers also expect that cinnamon oil could be a good mosquito repellant, though they have not yet tested it against adult mosquitoes.

Citronella:
Insect deterrent, keeps away mosquitoes, ticks, fleas and other pesky insects.

Eucalyptus:
insect bites and rashes, antiseptic

Lemongrass:
Lemongrass oil, which is closely related to citronella, repels a greater variety of pests than most natural "one-scented" oil mixtures.

Listsea Cubeba:
Insect deterrent

Patchouli:
repels bugs, and relieves insect bites.

Tea Tree:
Rashes and insect bites.

Avoid spraying around the face and not for use on very small children without the advice of a doctor.

Note: The FDA does not allow the use of the word "REPELLENT" on any natural insect deterrents.

AVOID PRODUCTS WITH DEET - Symptoms of DEET Exposure

- Eye and mucous membrane irritation.
- Ingestion can cause CNS disturbances.
- Desquamation about the nose, dryness of face, a slight tingling sensation. Contact urticaria.
- Toxicity is primarily neurologic (encephalopathy, seizures, movement disorders, coma) and may occur via oral or dermal exposure, most commonly in children.
- Bradycardia is rare but has been reported after dermal exposure to deet. Hypotension has been reported after large ingestions.
- Eye contact may result in a smarting sensation. A burning sensation of the lips, tongue and mouth may be noted.
- Confusion, ataxia, hypertonicity, and clonic jerking progressing to coma and seizures may occur after acute oral or chronic dermal exposure.
- Abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting.

Source for Symptoms:
Hazardous Substances Data Bank, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD. March 2003. (HSDB)

"I just tried your insect spray for the first time this weekend and it worked great! I love to fish but I get eaten up by mosquitoes and insects so I thought it was a worth a try as I won't use the toxic ones on the market. I sprayed it on when I got to the pond and I was extremely pleased that I did not get bitten one time! Also love that it is natural and organic." Eric, July 8, 2018
Purified water, lemongrass oil, organic saponified oils of coconut, olive & jojoba, orange oil, cedarwood oil, vegetable glycerin, organic jojoba seed oil, lavender oil, rosemary extract, organic aloe juice, essential oils of citronella, eucalyptus, catnip, cedarwood, lemongrass, lavender, listsea cubeba, tea tree, patchouli and cinnamon leaf essential oil.

Catnip:
Researchers report that nepetalactone, the essential oil in catnip that gives the plant its characteristic odor, is about ten times more effective at repelling mosquitoes than DEET — the compound used in most commercial insect repellents.

Cedarwood:
antiseptic, relieves skin inflammation, bug bites

Cinnamon Leaf:
shows promise as a great-smelling, environmentally friendly pesticide, with the ability to kill mosquito larvae, according to a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. The researchers also expect that cinnamon oil could be a good mosquito repellant, though they have not yet tested it against adult mosquitoes.

Citronella:
Insect deterrent, keeps away mosquitoes, ticks, fleas and other pesky insects.

Eucalyptus:
insect bites and rashes, antiseptic

Lemongrass:
Lemongrass oil, which is closely related to citronella, repels a greater variety of pests than most natural "one-scented" oil mixtures.

Listsea Cubeba:
Insect deterrent

Patchouli:
repels bugs, and relieves insect bites.

Tea Tree:
Rashes and insect bites.

Avoid spraying around the face and not for use on very small children without the advice of a doctor.

Note: The FDA does not allow the use of the word "REPELLENT" on any natural insect deterrents.